Great 2 BR 2 Bath House In Bloomfield

Rob's World

Contact info:
Robert George | RTG Property Solutions LLC |609-474-0360
Great 2 BR 2 Bath House In Bloomfield
163 Jerome Place, Bloomfield, NJ 07003
$182,160
KEY FEATURES
Year Built: 1902
Sq Footage: 1568 sqft.
Bedrooms: 2 Beds
Bathrooms: 2 Bath
Floors: 2
Lot Size: 3875 Square Feet
Property Type: Single Family House
HUD House FHA Case #352-611686. FHA financing IE (Insured Escrow) 203K Eligible. Available to all bidders. Bids are accepted daily until a winner is selected. For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

Contact info:
Robert George
RTG Property Solutions LLC
609-474-0360

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2 Units and Store Front (Mixed Use)

$100,000

 

138 Sanford Street, Irvington, NJ  07111

 

Call Robert for details and showings 609-474-0360.

 

HUD Home – 2 Units and store front. Unit 1 – 2 bedroom/1bath with deck.  Unit 2 – 1 bedroom/1bath.  Store front on first floor..  Currently available to owner-occupants only.   Bids are due 9/4/2017.  Property is Sold “AS IS”. Buyer may be eligible for $100.00 down payment ask how. If home built before 1978 a LBP addendum is included. FHA financing IE  (Insured Escrow) 203K Eligible. Case # 352-548347 For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

5 Bedroom Colonial in East Orange

$65,000

22 North 23rd Street, East Orange, NJ  07017

Spacious colonial featuring hardwood floors, five bedrooms 1 full bath. Excellent curb appeal. Centrally located. Private backyard. Property is Sold “AS IS”. Buyer may be eligible for $100.00 down payment ask how? If home built before 1978 a LBP addendum is included.  Easy NYC commute.  FHA Case Number: 352-528191.  FHA financing IE (insured with escrow) 203K Eligible.  Currently available to owner occupants only.  Bid deadline is 9/7/2017.  For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

 

Call Robert George for details and showings 609-474-0360

What the Ideal Amount of Protein Looks Like

3BR 1 Bath apt in Newark

OPEN HOUSE TODAY 6pm-7pm

 

Contact info:
Robert George | RTG Property Solutions | 609-474-0360

3 BR Apt in Newark

Alexander St, Newark, NJ 07106

$1300/mo

KEY FEATURES
Bedrooms: 2 Beds
Bathrooms: 1 Bath
Parking: None
Lease Duration: 1 Year
Deposit: $1,950
Pets Policy: No Pets Allowed
Property Type: Apartment

DESCRIPTION


3 BR Apt in Newark. Hardwood Floors. Updated kitchen. Close to parks, and transportation.

Contact info:
Robert George
RTG Property Solutions
609-474-0360

 

How Often Should You Weigh Yourself?

Imagine this: You decide it’s time to make a concerted effort to lose weight. You start exercising regularly and embark on a healthy eating plan. The time comes to check in on your progress, so you step on the scale for the moment of truth.

You haven’t lost any weight.

What do you do? Continue with the exercise and healthy eating plan? Throw in the towel, and go back to what you were doing before? Start restricting your eating even more as an effort to make weight loss happen faster?

These are all completely normal and reasonable reactions to a lack of success on the scale. Weight loss, maintenance or gain can be tricky to navigate. Put more plainly: The scale can be tricky to navigate.

Weight fluctuations are common because your weight is determined by a variety of factors. These include but are not limited to how hydrated you are, what you recently ate, your bathroom habits, the climate and your exercise routine. A few pounds of weight fluctuation here or there are usually not a result of fat gain but a result of your body doing exactly what it needs to do to regulate its physiological functions. So, how often should you weigh yourself? Whether your goal is maintenance, loss or gain, let’s talk about the scale.


READ MORE > 3 KEYS FOR WEIGHT LOSS YOU NEED TO KNOW


The very first question you need to ask yourself is: “Will weighing myself (daily, weekly, periodically, etc.) help me or harm me?” Since there’s no magic answer for how often to weigh yourself, figuring out what is helpful and motivating for you as an individual is how you decide.

DAILY WEIGH-INS

Many people find weighing in daily provides a sense of accountability and is helpful for having a good idea of where they are with their progress. For many, it helps to keep progress on track. If you’re able to look at the overall trend and not stress about the fluctuations, then by all means, weigh yourself daily.

Does a 0.4-pound weight gain sour your mood? Or, are you absolutely elated to see that you’re down 1 pound? If the daily weigh-ins powerfully affect your mood and behavior, then you might want to reconsider how often you weigh yourself. The number on the scale should not have the power to dictate your mood, the events of the day or your overall quality of life — it’s just a number.

WEEKLY WEIGH-INS

Weighing weekly can have its advantages — it allows you to track progress while still having six whole days to not focus on your weight.

For best results, pick a consistent day each week, and weigh yourself in the morning. Look for trends, but don’t get caught up in the minutiae. Recognize that it will take a few weeks to get a picture of where the trend is heading. This can be a good tool to help you feel accountable without making you ride the daily emotional roller coaster that is (or can be) the scale.

OCCASIONAL WEIGH-INS

Some people opt for the occasional weight check-in. People may do this at home or rely on the scale at the gym or doctor’s office to get an idea of where they are. People who opt for the occasional weigh-in often have alternative ways of identifying weight shifts, like the way their clothes fit or how strong they feel while exercising.

NEVER WEIGHING

There are many people out there who smash their scale and never look back. Some people find it helpful to focus on how they feel in their clothes, the balance of their meals and snacks and how they perform with their exercise rather than focusing on the number. This can be a valid way to approach health — there’s much more to health than a number on the scale!

If you are weighing yourself multiple times per day, stop! With rare exceptions, you should not weigh yourself more than once per day. Obsessing over a number on the scale can turn into a very problematic pattern that can disturb the peace and happiness in your life. If you decide to weigh yourself, the scale should be a tool that helps you, not harms you.

Overall, ask yourself about what is most helpful for you. For some, daily weigh-ins are the best route. For others, weighing less often is better for overall health. Each of us has different ways of experiencing things and inviting motivation and positivity into our lives. Find what works for you and stick to it!


3 Simple Ways to Build Consistency

Because Consistency is the Key to Success!
  — By Dean Anderson, Fitness & Behavior Expert
You don’t have to be an expert to figure out that consistency is pretty essential to successfully change your life, your health, and your weight. But it’s also pretty clear that building a consistent routine of regular exercise and healthy eating is not an easy thing to do.

You start off the day with the best intentions—to exercise, track all your food, and make healthy choices. But then life happens. One of the kids is sick, the babysitter is late, the snowplow blocked your driveway, the boss asks you to work overtime, or any one of a hundred other surprises that can really wreck your day. Before you know it, your plan is in trouble and your prospects for “sticking to it” aren’t looking very good. In fact, things are probably going to get worse as the day goes on. By the end of the day, you have no energy left for exercise, and the task of preparing a healthy meal feels like a big burden when what you really want is a break. Something has to give.

More often than not, “what gives” is your plan to exercise and eat right. When it’s hard to do everything, the things most likely to go undone are those that don’t affect or involve anyone but you—especially if those things aren’t exactly your favorite things to do anyway.

So how do you change this pattern? With the three rules for building consistency.

These three simple rules, when followed faithfully, will make it easier for you to be consistent with your healthy lifestyle habits—even on the toughest days.

Rule #1: Never tell yourself “I’m not motivated.”
That’s not the real problem, unless you really don’t want to lose weight or live a healthy lifestyle. As long as you do want these things, you have all the motivation you need.

It may be true that sometimes you don’t want to exercise, or that you really want to stop and get fast food rather than cooking dinner. That’s understandable, but it doesn’t mean you’re not motivated. It just means that you want two different and opposing things, and you have to make a decision. Telling yourself that you lack motivation is just a way of denying that you really do have a choice. It makes the problem seem mysterious and out of your control, and it makes you feel less powerful than you really are, because you lack something (the motivation) you need. Not true!

In the long run you’ll do better if you acknowledge that the choice is yours to make. You can choose either option, without making excuses or inventing a theory like “lack of motivation” to justify it. Then, pay attention to how you feel about the choice you made, and decide whether that is how you want to feel most of the time.

Being consistent does not mean being perfect. (There are going to be days when you decide to do something other than stick to your exercise and diet routine, and that’s fine.) But becoming consistent does mean giving yourself the power to choose.

Rule #2: Build momentum one step at a time.
It’s never easy to change old habits or start new routines. Studies show that it takes anywhere from 21 to 40 days to really turn a new behavior into a persistent habit. And during that time, you’re going to have to work at it pretty diligently—even when you don’t feel like it.

The key to long term consistency is building momentum. The hardest part is always getting things started. But once you’re moving, staying in motion and picking up speed becomes a lot easier. There are a lot of ways you can gradually build momentum during those first few weeks. Here are some examples:

  • Start with something that’s pretty easy to manage and build up from there. Set a goal of one 10-minute exercise session per week. Then increase it to two 10-minute sessions. Gradually add minutes to each workout (and eventually add one or more additional workouts to your week), until you’re exercising as long and as frequently as you should in order to reach your goals. The simple act of setting aside some time for exercise every day, no matter how little, and sticking to it is enough to start building the habit.
  • Find an accountability buddy—someone who knows about your plan and is willing to give you a push when you feel like slacking off.
  • Join a Team or Challenge here at SparkPeople. It’s always harder to let someone else down than it is to let yourself off the hook.
  • Employ an excuse buster. Find a friend, family member, or SparkPeople member whose judgment and opinion you respect. Each time you find yourself thinking about skipping an exercise session or blowing your meal plan, write down the reason for your choice. Share this reason with your excuse buster and get her honest opinion about whether the reason for your choice is reasonable or just an excuse. You’ll probably find that this makes it a lot harder for you to believe your own rationalizations.

Rule #3: Always have a plan B.
Because life is unpredictable and complicated, you need to have plan B ready—even before you actually need it. Plan B is an alternative way to stay consistent with your goals when your regular routine (or something else) doesn’t work out as planned. Obviously, you can’t foresee every single problem that might come up. But most of the time, the things that get in your way are things that happen fairly often—like kids getting sick, extra hours at work, or days when you just don’t feel very energetic. Those surprises won’t throw you off track if you plan ahead. For example, have a friend or family member lined up to stay with your kids so you can make it to the gym; stock your freezer with some healthy meals when you’re short on time; stash your exercise clothes at the office for a quick workout when you can’t get away.

Put a little time into identifying the most common problems that disrupt your healthy routine, and plan (in advance) what you can do to handle these problems without sacrificing your diet and exercise routine. Then all you’ll have to do is put your plan B into action.

Following these three simple rules will help you overcome some common obstacles while building the momentum you need to stay consistent. At the very least, you’ll be able to take all those lemons that life hands you, and make some good (and diet-friendly) lemonade out of them.

Original Post on SparkPeople.com

Stop Emotional Eating Before It Starts

15 Ways to Turn Off Your Emotions without Turning to Food
  — By Nicole Nichols, Health Educator
Eating is more than something we do to nourish our bodies with vital nutrients. It’s also an activity we do out of habit, like nail biting, hair twirling, or finger tapping. And sometimes, we habitually turn to food in response to certain emotions. Whether you feel angry, sad, bored—even excited—food can act as a buffer against these emotions, something 82 percent of you know all too well.

Emotional eaters know that it’s easier to stuff down our feelings with each bite. We know that the fleeting “high” we get from food blocks the pain or discomfort of dealing we might be feeling, even if only temporarily. We also know better; in the long run, we still feel bad and we know that we shouldn’t eat for purely emotional reasons. But that knowledge isn’t enough to stop what feels like an addiction to food and eating. So where do you start if you want to stop eating emotionally?

It may be cliché, but the first step is awareness, recognizing that you do eat emotionally—and WHY. Each time you reach for foods (or even feel a craving come on), ask yourself, “Am I really hungry or am I just responding to something else that is happening?” If hunger isn’t the reason, it’s not always easy to pinpoint the reason why you feel like eating. Tracking your food can help, especially if you note the times you eat and how you were feeling before, during and afterward. By tracking your food (and related notes) more regularly, you could notice trends, like a tendency to overeat on Mondays, for example, and then pinpoint your true feelings from there. Ask yourself what it is about Mondays that leads to overeating (Stress from getting the kids to school? Anger over going to a job you hate?) Notice if you tend to munch in the evenings. Is it out of boredom, loneliness, or an unhappy relationship? Journaling (or blogging), in addition to tracking your food intake, can help you examine the causes of eating episodes so you can pinpoint your feelings.

While emotional eaters soothe themselves with food to avoid feeling and examining uncomfortable emotions, that gratification is temporary—and still painful, just like the emotions you’re trying to avoid. But if you learn to recognize the emotional triggers that lead to eating, you can also learn to stop emotional eating before it starts by choose healthier ways to deal with your feelings. Here are some alternatives to eating that can help you deal with three of the most common emotions that can lead to eating.

Stress and Anger
Stress is part of our everyday lives, and it can create the same physiological responses as anger, such as increased heart rate and blood pressure. If you are eating as a response to anger and/or stress, some of these activities will help you calm down and deal with the issue at hand, instead of covering it up with food.

  • Remove yourself from the stressful situation. If you’ve had an altercation with a friend or family member, take some time away from each other to calm down and get your thoughts together. Make a list of what you want to say to the person with whom you’ve had the conflict, and revisit the issue later when you’re both calm.
  • Take some deep breaths. Deep breathing has been shown to reduce blood pressure and promote feelings of calmness. Try this simple breathing activity any time you need to de-stress.
  • Exercise. It’s a known stress buster and you may even find that it helps you deal with anger. Go for a short walk outside, hit some tennis balls, or push around some heavy weights at the gym—these are all constructive ways to deal with stress and anger.
  • Listen to music. We can all think of some songs that calm us down. Make a special CD or playlist that you can turn to when you need it. Identify this as a trigger of emotional eating.
  • Prevent stress from happening again. If mornings are so busy that you’re barely able to get out the door on time, put some time-management skills into practice so that you don’t have to rush or feel stressed each morning.

Sadness and Loneliness
These two emotions often go hand in hand. Loneliness can result in sadness, and sad people can often become withdrawn. Especially if you’re dealing with grief or spending a lot of time alone, it’s easy to turn to comfort foods or soothe yourself with foods that you associate with happier memories. Instead, work to replace these uncomfortable emotions with a positive action. Learn to use alternative activities as sources of gratification. Just as you’ve learned to turn to food for a pick-me-up, you can learn to use other activities in the same way.

  • Exercise. It boosts mood, releases endorphins (feel-good chemicals in the brain), and has even been reported to be more addictive than drugs. Anything you do to get yourself moving will work. Leaving the house for a short bike ride or walk will also help you avoid food temptations at home.
  • Play with your pet; animals have unconditional love and promote health and emotional wellness, too. If you don’t have a pet, volunteer at a local shelter, which will expose you to both animals and more social interaction to combat your loneliness.
  • Write a letter to a friend. Reaching out to friends and family members, even if you haven’t talked to them in awhile, will remind you of all the wonderful people in your life who care about you. Spark up an old friendship!
  • Volunteer. People who volunteer feel better about themselves, and it’s hard to feel down on yourself when you’re helping others.
  • Post on the message boards! Even if you feel like you don’t have a friend in the world, there is always someone here at SparkPeople who can help pick you up when you are feeling down.

Boredom
We have hundreds of TV channels, phones that surf the web, online social networks, and movement-sensing video games, but when it comes down to it, we still feel bored in our lives. Eating adds another layer to our entertainment options (like popcorn at a movie) but also becomes an easy thing to do when we don’t know what else to do! After all, eating is fun and enjoyable, and it passes the time. Fortunately, many boredom-busting activities don’t involve eating.

  • Pay attention to what you consume. Make a new rule that you will not multitask while you eat. That means no chips while on the computer and no ice cream while watching your favorite TV drama. If you’re going to eat, you’re going to be present and focus on the food you’re enjoying to help avoid mindless overeating.
  • Develop a new hobby. Even without cash to spare, you can learn to knit, join a local book club, or train for a 5K race. By scheduling these activities regularly, you’ll have plenty to do—and practice! Make a list of all the things you ever wanted to learn, from cooking to speaking a new language, and start investigating how to get started.
  • Read. We don’t spend enough time reading these days, and while you may claim that you don’t have the time, everyone has a few minutes here and there. Carry your book, favorite newspaper or magazine with you and steal minutes whenever you have downtime. Set a goal to read just 15 minutes each night, and you may find that stretching longer (and keeping your mind and fingers busy enough that they won’t miss eating).
  • Play a game. Remember how fun board and card games can be? Some even take hours! Bring out a fun game for your next party or set up a game night with your best friend. If you’re by yourself, crossword puzzles are a good alternative.
  • Connect with friends and loved ones. Some might argue that we feel so bored during this digital age because we’re missing real-life interaction and friendships. After all, if you can post on your friend’s Facebook wall or text your brother anytime, why call? Make a point to write letters, send personal emails, make phone calls and meet up with the important people in your life.

With an arsenal of activities you can do besides eating, you’re on the right path to stop the emotional eating cycle. You might not be successful every time, but if you accept your mistakes and move forward, continuing to work on your issues by tracking, journaling and distracting yourself in a positive way, you’ll overcome your emotional eating problems once and for all. With so many enjoyable experiences in life, food doesn’t have to take center stage. Make sure you are taking time to enjoy all of them equally!

Original Post on SparkPeople.com

Large 5 BR, 3Bath Colonial in East Orange

$75,000

14 Watson Avenue, East Orange, NJ  07018

Spacious colonial featuring hardwood floors, five bedrooms two  kitchens, three full baths. Excellent curb appeal. Centrally located. Property is Sold “AS IS”. Buyer may be eligible for $100.00 down payment ask how? If home built before 1978 a LBP addendum is included.  Easy NYC commute.  FHA Case Number: 352-636261.  FHA financing UI (uninsured) 203K Eligible.  Available to all bidders.  Bids are accepted daily until a winner is selected. For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

 

Call Robert George for details and showings 609-474-0360.

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