Charming 4 BR 2 Bath House In West Orange

Contact info:
Robert George | RTG Property Solutions LLC | 609-474-0360

70 Whittlesey Avenue, West Orange, NJ 07052

$183,000

KEY FEATURES
Year Built: 1900
Sq Footage: 1628 sqft.
Bedrooms: 4 Beds
Bathrooms: 2 Bath
Floors: 2
Lot Size: 5000 Square Feet
Property Type: Single Family House

HUD House  FHA Case #352-617898.  FHA financing IE  (Insured Escrow) 203K Eligible.  Currently available to owner occupants only. Property is Sold “AS IS”. Buyer may be eligible for $100.00 down payment ask how? If home built before 1978 a LBP addendum is included.  Bids deadline is 6/4/2017. For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

Contact info:
Robert George
RTG Property Solutions LLC
609-474-0360

5 BR Single Family House in West Orange

$423,200

 

8 Forest Avenue, West Orange, NJ  07052

 

Call Robert for details and showings 609-474-0360.

 

HUD Home – 5 Bedroom 3 bath with detached garage. Property available for all bidders.   Bids are accepted daily until a winning bid is selected.  Property is Sold “AS IS”. Buyer may be eligible for $100.00 down payment ask how? If home built before 1978 a LBP addendum is included. FHA financing UI (uninsured) 203K Eligible. Case # 352-738327  For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

Great 2 BR 2 Bath House In Bloomfield – $182160

Contact info:
Robert George | RTG Property Solutions LLC | 609-474-0360

Great 2 BR 2 Bath House In Bloomfield

163 Jerome Place, Bloomfield, NJ 07003

$182,160

KEY FEATURES
Year Built: 1902
Sq Footage: 1568 sqft.
Bedrooms: 2 Beds
Bathrooms: 2 Bath
Floors: 2
Lot Size: 3875 Square Feet
Property Type: Single Family House

HUD House  FHA Case #352-611686.  FHA financing IE  (Insured Escrow) 203K Eligible.  Available to all bidders.  Bids are accepted daily until a winner is selected. For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

Contact info:
Robert George
RTG Property Solutions LLC
609-474-0360

Toning vs. Bulking Up: The Real Facts

5 Myths and Truths about Strength Training
  — By Jennipher Walters, Certified Personal Trainer and Fitness Instructor
Everyone has an idea in their head when it comes to looking their fittest and healthiest. For some, it’s fitting perfectly into a certain outfit, or walking on the beach in a bikini with total confidence. For others, it may mean seeing a defined midsection reflected in the mirror, or having strong, toned shoulders or legs. We all have our own goals for how we want to look and feel. Although your specific goals may be different from those of others, almost everyone wants to look and feel toned and fit.

But what does “toned” really mean? And is it different from “bulking” up? This article sets out to define just that—and to dispel some myths about toning, strengthening and bulking up.

What Is Toning?
When most people say that they want to “tone up,” what they usually mean is that they want to become leaner. Basically, they want to lose fat, and add a little muscle definition—but not so much muscle mass that they look like a bodybuilder (much more on that later).

In the fitness world, there is no real definition for toning that is greatly recognized. Rather, toning is a term used to describe the end goal, which usually results from a combination of basic weight-lifting and fat-burning.

What about Bulking Up?
Typically, men want to “bulk up” and women usually wish to avoid building big, bulky muscles. Although there is no strict definition, “bulking up” means adding a lot of muscle mass to the body and possibly (although not always) reducing one’s body fat, too. Bulking up harkens images of bodybuilders and big football players—usually male and usually beefy!

Toning, on the other hand, typically refers to aerobics instructors and Hollywood starlets who have lower amounts of body fat and some visible muscle, but not huge muscles.

So now that we have our definitions straight, let’s move on to facts and the fallacies about toning up and bulking up.
The 5 Most Common Myths about Toning and Bulking Up

Myth #1: Lifting light weights will tone your body and lifting heavy weights will bulk you up.

The Truth: I’m not sure who first pioneered this idea that heavy weights will bulk you up, but it has stuck over the years and erroneously makes many people—both men and women—afraid of lifting heavy weights. While there is some truth to the idea that lifting lighter weights for more reps does a better job of increasing the muscular endurance, lighter weights will not help you “tone” better than heavy weights. In fact, because heavier weights build the strength of your muscles (and the size to a small degree—no Hulk action here), thereby helping to increase your metabolism and burn fat, lifting heavier weights with fewer reps (8 to 12 on average) and working until you’re fatigued is more effective at helping you reach your toning goals than lifting lighter weights. Not to mention that it’s more time efficient, too!

Myth #2: Building muscle and bulking up are one in the same.

The Truth: If you’ve been avoiding weights because you think that building muscle means that you’ll bulk up, think again. When you lift weights that are challenging, you actually create micro-tears in the muscle fibers. These tears are then repaired by the body (this is where soreness comes from!) and in that process the muscle becomes stronger and a little bit bigger. However, because muscle tissue is more dense than fat, adding a little bit more muscle to your body and decreasing your fat actually makes you look leaner—not bigger. To really bulk up, you have to really work with that goal in mind. Bodybuilders spend hours and hours in the gym lifting extremely heavy weights, along with eating a very strict diet that promotes muscle gain. The average person’s workout and diet—especially a calorie-controlled diet—doesn’t’ result in the same effects.

Myth #3: Lifting light weights won’t help you get stronger.

The Truth: When it comes to lifting weights, the secret to really getting stronger isn’t about how much weight you’re lifting. Instead, it’s all about working your muscle to fatigue where you literally cannot lift the weight for another repetition. The August 2010 study from McMaster University that proved this found that even when subjects lifted lighter weights, they added as much muscle as those lifting heavy weights. However, the time it takes to reach fatigue with light weights is much longer than the time it takes to reach fatigue with heavier weights. So, if you’re like most people and extra time is a luxury, it makes more sense to go heavy and then go home!

Myth #4: Women and men should lift weights differently.

The Truth: I see this one all the time at the gym. It’s pretty common to see women lift 3- to 5-pound dumbbells to do biceps curls while men pick up the 20-pounders to do the same exercise. Although men are genetically stronger than women, they aren’t that much stronger. Second, most women tend to stick to the weight machines or basic leg-work that target the rear end and abs (women’s “vanity” muscles), while the guys at the gym are more likely to be seen working out with free weights or using barbells and—most often—focusing on their vanity muscles: the biceps and chest.

Obviously gender differences exist and everyone has different goals (like we discussed in the beginning). But if you really want to lose weight and get lean—no matter if you call that toning or bulking—people of both genders should have a strength-training plan in place that works every major muscle in the body at least 8 to 12 times, using a weight that is heavy enough that the last two repetitions are darn hard to lift. Only then is the body challenged enough to change, grow and adapt, making you stronger and leaner no matter if you’re male or female. Lifting this way is also a great way to lose weight.

Myth #5: Certain forms of exercise build long, lean muscles.

The Truth: Many forms of exercise claim to lengthen the muscles or develop “lean” muscles, not bulky ones. But here’s a truth that may be shocking to some: To put it another way, no form of exercise makes muscles “longer” because your muscles do not—and will not—respond to exercise by getting longer. It’s just not how they work. Muscles are a certain length because they attach to your bones. A wide variety of movements and exercises can help you strengthen your muscles without necessarily making them bigger. In fact, you can develop a lot of muscular strength without your muscles ever increasing in size (girth).

That said, exercises such as yoga, Pilates, dance and barre classes can help to increase your flexibility (improving your range of motion at certain joints) and your posture, which can give you the illusion of feeling and looking longer or taller. But lengthening? Not possible. Claims like these are just trying to appeal to people who fear bulking up.

If you’re ready to get strong, be sure to check out some of SparkPeople’s amazing free resources and workout plans that will help you do just that!

Everything You Need to Know about Strength Training
How to Fall in Love with Strength Training
A Get-Lean Strength Workout Plan
Get More Results in Less Time with High-Intensity Strength Training
The Perfect Strength Workout for Beginners
The Muscle Building Quiz

Sources
PLoS ONE. Burd NA, West DWD, Staples AW, Atherton PJ, Baker JM, et al. “Low-Load High Volume Resistance Exercise Stimulates Muscle Protein Synthesis More Than High-Load Low Volume Resistance Exercise in Young Men,” Accessed August 2011. http://www.plosone.com.

Original Post on SparkPeople.com

Can Exercise Take the Knee and Back Pain Away?

  — By Greg Presto
In pain? You’re not alone.

According to a survey of 28,900 adults back in 2003, 13 percent of the American workforce lost productivity in a two-week period due to pain. More recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and National Center for Health Statistics showed that knee and low back pain affect 19.5 and 28.1 percent of Americans, respectively.

And it’s not just lost productivity that’s at risk: Pain can keep you from doing things you love, from concentrating on the time you’re spending with your kids or grandkids, and it can keep you from exercising, which can ultimately shorten your life. But if you’re experiencing chronic pain, should you really be skipping the gym? Or, could exercise actually be an answer to chronic pain?

For back and knee pain, the research says, well, maybe. You should always see a doctor before beginning an exercise program, but exercise has been found in multiple studies to not only relieve pain, but increase the sufferer’s future threshold for pain through a process called “exercise-induced analgesia.” For knee pain, multiple studies have found that isometric exercise of the quadriceps, where the front of the thigh is flexed in a static position for a prescribed period, reduced knee pain and future incidents of that pain by strengthening the thigh muscle. In a JAMA Internal Medicine review of 23 relevant studies, researchers found that for back pain, there was “moderate quality” evidence that exercise paired with back pain education reduced future episodes of low back pain.

The education step is key: In studies where participants did exercises for low back pain without education on its root causes, the evidence that patients were helped was significantly reduced. Your pre-exercise doctor’s visit or a visit to an expert on posture and biomechanics is a good opportunity to get information on why you might be experiencing pain and how to alleviate it.

“The biggest faulty body alignment that is the underlying cause for low back pain is undoubtedly a pelvic deviation or misalignment,” says Aaron Brooks, a biomechanics expert and the owner of Perfect Postures in Massachusetts. Pelvic misalignment, Brooks says, can be either a consistently rotated pelvis or one that’s elevated on one side, causing constant compression on the vertebrae of the lower back. “Most people don’t realize they have these deviations unless they get evaluated.”<pagebreak>
Unfortunately, many exercises that have shown results for alleviating pain are tough to reproduce at home—they involve laboratory-specific gizmos that aren’t found in your gym, calibrated to have the patient flex a muscle at a very specific percentage of total strength. Some studies, though, have used exercises that you can try at home with little to no equipment. If you’re experiencing back or knee pain, and you’ve talked to your doctor, experiment with these 10 moves designed to strengthen your body and potentially reduce future incidents of pain. Brooks and Craig Ballantyne, owner of Turbulence Training and author of “The Great Cardio Myth,” share their best form tips to ensure that you perform each move safely and efficiently every time. If your pain increases, stop the movements for the time being and consult a doctor to determine the best course of action for your particular situation.

Knee Pain, Knee Pain Go Away

Multiple studies have used the four following exercises to help alleviate knee pain. In one study published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 191 men and women between the ages of 40 and 80 who suffered from knee pain saw a pain reduction of 22 percent after performing these moves daily for just six months.

1. Seated five-second isometric quadriceps contraction

The first exercise is an isometric, or static, quadriceps contraction. To begin, sit against a wall with your back supported, legs extended and a rolled-up towel under one knee. Contract the front of the thigh to press the towel against the floor, holding for five seconds. Move the towel to the other leg, and repeat. Perform up to 20 repetitions per side.

For an alternate seated quadriceps exercise, Brooks suggests sitting in a similar position, but with your back away from the wall and your hands on the floor to help you sit up straight. With feet flexed towards your waist, lift one leg off the floor, keeping the foot flexed back and the quadricep contracted. Repeat the lifting and lowering for 10 reps and then switch legs. Repeat for two to three sets total.

2. Mid-flexion seated hold

Sitting in a chair with your back straight and feet flat on the floor, raise one leg off the floor halfway up and hold for five seconds. Return to start, then repeat with the other leg. Perform up to 20 repetitions on each side.

3. Prone hamstring contraction

Lie face down on a mat or soft floor surface, with arms at your sides and legs straight. Bend one knee to bring your foot up toward your butt, keeping your hips square and on the floor. Return to start, and repeat on the other side. Perform up to 20 repetitions per leg.<pagebreak>
4. Bodyweight step-up

The bodyweight step-up is as simple as stepping up and down from a single step. To keep tension on the correct muscles and to keep your knee safe during the exercise, though, Ballantyne recommends focusing “on ‘pulling’ yourself up to the top position using the [hamstrings and glutes].” One way to keep focus on the backs of your legs is to raise your toes off the ground—and keep them there—as you start the movement, keeping weight in your heels. “Keep your chest up, your head up and your abs slightly braced” as you step up, is Ballantyne’s advice. Then, as you come down, he says to focus on the quadriceps as you slowly lower yourself, rather than slamming back down.

Bye-Bye Back Pain

1. Passive prone extension

In a study of 314 Danish military personnel, study participants were educated about low back pain and prescribed to perform the passive prone extension exercise described below. Those who performed this exercise 15 times per day were significantly less likely to report low back issues or injury during their remaining time in the military when compared to those who did not do the exercise.

Again, be sure to consult your doctor before performing this or any move, Brooks says. “If someone has a pre-existing disc bulge or herniation, this exercise could actually irritate the low back pain.”

To perform, lie face down with your legs straight and palms flat on the ground just outside the chest at the nipple line. Keep the shoulder blades together as you press through the arms to extend the low back and raise the chest. Hold for a moment, then return to start. Repeat 15 times.

“If the exercise bothers [your] neck,” Brooks says, you can “allow the head to hang or keep it neutral where there is no pain.”

2. Supine glute contraction

In a small pilot study from 2012, a series of six exercises focused on balance-control were used daily in a system that kept participants who performed them from experiencing low back pain in the year that followed. About 60 percent of participants who did not perform these exercises did experience low back pain during the same period. The five listed here require no special equipment and can be performed at home.

The first exercise is a lying glute contraction. Lying with arms interlaced behind the head and legs out straight, squeeze your butt while keeping your elbows on the floor. Hold the squeeze for a second and release. Repeat 25 times total.<pagebreak>
3. Supine vacuum with rotation

This exercise works your transverse abdominis, or TVA, a muscle that encircles your organs and braces them against your spine. To do this move, lie face up with elbows behind your head. Take a deep breath in, then exhale all of the air out of your lungs as you lift and expand your chest while drawing your belly button towards your spine. Don’t hold your breath; keep your stomach sucked in as you take in your next breath and try to bring your navel closer to your spine with each exhale. Lift your legs off the floor slightly and create small circles while keeping your legs straight and elbows on the floor. Circle 15 times.

4. Glute bridge

Lie face up on a mat with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Place your arms at your sides, palms up. Keeping your feet flat on the floor, squeeze your glutes to slowly raise your hips off the floor until your body forms a straight line from your knees to your shoulders. Hold at the top for a count of five, then slowly return to start. Repeat five more times.

5. Supine twist

Lie face up on a mat with your legs straight and arms out, forming a “T” shape. Draw your right knee towards your chest so your leg forms a 90-degree angle. Rotate your knee to the left so it drops over your left leg and your spine twists. Take care to keep both shoulders on the floor throughout the movement. To enhance the stretch, turn your head to look in the opposite direction. Hold for five seconds, then switch sides.

6. Standing broomstick twist

Stand with feet hip-width apart, with a broomstick held over your shoulders. Keeping your eyes focused on a spot on the floor in front of you, twist your torso to the right while your feet stay in place. Slowly twist back to start and repeat to the left. Perform 20 total twists.

Whether it’s due to age, your joints or a preexisting injury, knee and back pain affects many, but it doesn’t have to slow you down. Learn to incorporate a few of these moves into your morning routine and, over time, you might find that you’re stronger, healthier and better equipped to handle your pain.

Original Post on Sparkpeople.com

Great 2 BR 2 Bath House In Bloomfield

Contact info:
Robert George | RTG Property Solutions LLC | 609-474-0360

Great 2 BR 2 Bath House In Bloomfield

163 Jerome Place, Bloomfield, NJ 07003

$182,160

KEY FEATURES
Year Built: 1902
Sq Footage: 1568 sqft.
Bedrooms: 2 Beds
Bathrooms: 2 Bath
Floors: 2
Lot Size: 3875 Square Feet
Property Type: Single Family House

HUD House  FHA Case #352-611686.  FHA financing IE  (Insured Escrow) 203K Eligible.  Available to all bidders.  Bids are accepted daily until a winner is selected. For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

Contact info:
Robert George
RTG Property Solutions LLC
609-474-0360

 

Great 3 BR House In Hillside

Contact info:
Robert George | RTG Property Solutions LLC | 609-474-0360

Great 3 BR House In Hillside

527 Buchannan Street, Hillside, NJ  07205

$100,000

KEY FEATURES
Year Built: 1929
Sq Footage: 1368 sqft.
Bedrooms: 3 Beds
Bathrooms: 1 Bath
Floors: 2
Lot Size: 3745 Square Feet
Property Type: Single Family House

HUD House  FHA Case #352-542303.  FHA financing UI (uninsured) 203K Eligible.  Available to all bidders.  Bids are accepted daily until a winner is selected. For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

Contact info:
Robert George
RTG Property Solutions LLC
609-474-0360

5 BR Single Family House in West Orange – PRICE REDUCTION

$423,200

 

8 Forest Avenue, West Orange, NJ  07052

 

Call Robert for details and showings 609-474-0360.

 

HUD Home – 5 Bedroom 3 bath with detached garage. Property available for all bidders.   Bids are accepted daily until a winning bid is selected.  Property is Sold “AS IS”. Buyer may be eligible for $100.00 down payment ask how? If home built before 1978 a LBP addendum is included. FHA financing UI (uninsured) 203K Eligible. Case # 352-738327  For property condition report, forms, disclosures, availability and to place a bid please visit http://www.hudhomestore.com. Buyer to verify all information.

6 BR Single Family House in East Orange

$95,000

15 Chelsea Place, East Orange, NJ  07017

 

Charming 6BR/2BATH Located on a quiet out of the way street. Private yard. HUD owned

property being sold AS IS, buyer responsible for all city inspections.

HUD Code IE (Insurable with Repair Escrow) HUD case #352-552167.  Property currently available to owner-occupants only.  Bids deadline is 5/29/2017.  203K Eligible.

 

Call Rob for details and showings.  609-474-0360