Day 30 of the 200 Mile Challenge

I thought I was going to get my 200th mile today but I missed it by one mile.  ONE LOUSY MILE.  Well I will get it first thing in the morning and then see how the day goes.  I got in 6.19 miles today, reached my water goal and got over 12,000 steps.  Tomorrow will be my triumph though.  200 MILES!!!!  Not sure when I am going to do this again, lol.

The numbers:

  • 6.19 miles today.
  • 6.63 miles per day average.
  • 198.97 miles for the month
  • 1.03 miles to go.

#10000steps #200mileschallenge

2 Family House near Orange Park (Handyman Special)

Contact info:
Robert T George | RTG Property Solutions LLC | 609-474-0360

2 Family House near Orange Park (Handyman Special)

375 Olcott St, Orange, NJ 07050

$81,000

KEY FEATURES
Year Built: 1927
Sq Footage: 2540 sqft.
Bedrooms: 4 Beds
Bathrooms: 2 Baths
Floors: 2
Parking: 1 Off street
Property Type: Multi-Family

DESCRIPTION


2 Family house in Orange right next to Orange Park. Near public transportation and I-280. This is a HUD home being sold “As Is”. Buyer is responsible for all inspections and certifications.

Contact info:
Robert T George
RTG Property Solutions LLC
609-474-0360

Day 28 of the 200 Mile Challenge

Today is the end of the forth week of the challenge.  I am glad this thing is almost over because I am ready to take a few days off.  I did 5.84 total miles today.   That gave me a total of 43.53 miles for the week, my worst week of the challenge after having my best week last week (54.43 miles).  I did hit my water goal for the day with 118.3 ounces.   I have 187.82 total miles for the month which leaves just 12.18!!!  Hopefully I will hit the goal om Tuesday.

#10000steps #200milechallenge

 

Why Strength Training is a Must for Everyone

Strength Becomes More Important with Age

  — By Jen Mueller, Certified Personal Trainer
Think you’re too old to start a strength training program? Well think again! Strength training is just what your body needs to fight the loss of muscle, bone mass and strength that comes with age.

Everyone, no matter how young or old, should be doing some kind of regular strength training. This could be at the gym, or at home using very little equipment. Resistance bands and balls, small hand weights, water and even your own body weight can be used as resistance when designing a strength training program.

So what’s the point? If you’ve never participated in a strength training program, why start now? Here are some very important reasons strength training makes a difference in your quality of life:

  • Improves your ability to do everyday activities: The stronger your muscles, the easier it is to get groceries out of the car, get a package off of the top cabinet shelf, push the lawnmower…..the list goes on and on!
  • Improves your balance and stability: The stronger and more resilient your muscles, the more balance is sturdier. This will help keep you safe in your daily activities and decreases the risk of falls or accidents.
  • Builds muscle strength: Adults lose between five and seven pounds of muscle every decade after age 20. Strength training will help prevent this muscle loss, and rebuild what you may have lost.
  • Decreases your risk of osteoporosis: Inactivity and aging can lead to a decrease in bone density, leading to brittleness. Studies have shown that consistent strength training can increase bone density and prevent osteoporosis.
  • Reduces blood pressure: Strength training can be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure by strengthening the heart, allowing it to beat more efficiently.
  • Increases calorie burn: Strength training increases the body’s metabolic rate, causing the body to burn more calories throughout the day. This aids significantly in long term weight loss.
  • Reduces low back pain: Research has shown that strength training can increase low back strength and alleviate low back pain.<pagebreak>

Time spent on strength training can literally help you turn back the clock and feel younger each day. Here are some principles to remember when putting together a program:

  • Start by strength training 2 days/week, building up to 3 days/week for more of a challenge. Make sure you have at least one day of rest in between each session.
  • Start with 2-3 exercises each for lower body and upper body and 1-2 core exercises (abs, lower back). Examples of exercises can be found in the Fitness Resource Center.
  • Start with one set of each exercise (12-15 repetitions- slow and steady), using light hand weights, resistance bands or your own body weight. As you progress, you can work up to 2 and then 3 sets.
  • As you add additional sets, rest 30 seconds to a minute in between each one.
  • Never hold your breath during the exercises. Always exhale when exerting force (on the hard part of the movement).
  • Always warm up before and stretch before and after each session.
  • Pay attention to proper form and technique, as they are very important for injury prevention and producing results.
  • When selecting a weight, it should be heavy enough that you feel the muscle working and the difficulty increasing as you get to the 15th repetition. The weight should be light enough that you can do 15 repetitions without pain or breaking proper form.
  • Strength training should never be painful! If you experience pain, stop the exercise immediately.

No matter what your age, you have a lot to gain from regular strength training. Just remember to consult your doctor before starting any exercise program. It is one of the most important things you can do to ensure your independence for many years to come.

Day 26 of the 200 Mile Challenge

The heat and humidity have returned but that did not slow me down.  I got it 7.08 miles today but missed my water goal.  Only five days left in the challenge and I think I am going to make it!!!

7.08 miles today

175.04 miles for the month

24.96 miles to go!!!  #10000 steps #200milechallenge

Stop Emotional Eating Before It Starts

15 Ways to Turn Off Your Emotions without Turning to Food
  — By Nicole Nichols, Health Educator
Eating is more than something we do to nourish our bodies with vital nutrients. It’s also an activity we do out of habit, like nail biting, hair twirling, or finger tapping. And sometimes, we habitually turn to food in response to certain emotions. Whether you feel angry, sad, bored—even excited—food can act as a buffer against these emotions, something 82 percent of you know all too well.

Emotional eaters know that it’s easier to stuff down our feelings with each bite. We know that the fleeting “high” we get from food blocks the pain or discomfort of dealing we might be feeling, even if only temporarily. We also know better; in the long run, we still feel bad and we know that we shouldn’t eat for purely emotional reasons. But that knowledge isn’t enough to stop what feels like an addiction to food and eating. So where do you start if you want to stop eating emotionally?

It may be cliché, but the first step is awareness, recognizing that you do eat emotionally—and WHY. Each time you reach for foods (or even feel a craving come on), ask yourself, “Am I really hungry or am I just responding to something else that is happening?” If hunger isn’t the reason, it’s not always easy to pinpoint the reason why you feel like eating. Tracking your food can help, especially if you note the times you eat and how you were feeling before, during and afterward. By tracking your food (and related notes) more regularly, you could notice trends, like a tendency to overeat on Mondays, for example, and then pinpoint your true feelings from there. Ask yourself what it is about Mondays that leads to overeating (Stress from getting the kids to school? Anger over going to a job you hate?) Notice if you tend to munch in the evenings. Is it out of boredom, loneliness, or an unhappy relationship? Journaling (or blogging), in addition to tracking your food intake, can help you examine the causes of eating episodes so you can pinpoint your feelings.

While emotional eaters soothe themselves with food to avoid feeling and examining uncomfortable emotions, that gratification is temporary—and still painful, just like the emotions you’re trying to avoid. But if you learn to recognize the emotional triggers that lead to eating, you can also learn to stop emotional eating before it starts by choose healthier ways to deal with your feelings. Here are some alternatives to eating that can help you deal with three of the most common emotions that can lead to eating.

Stress and Anger
Stress is part of our everyday lives, and it can create the same physiological responses as anger, such as increased heart rate and blood pressure. If you are eating as a response to anger and/or stress, some of these activities will help you calm down and deal with the issue at hand, instead of covering it up with food.

  • Remove yourself from the stressful situation. If you’ve had an altercation with a friend or family member, take some time away from each other to calm down and get your thoughts together. Make a list of what you want to say to the person with whom you’ve had the conflict, and revisit the issue later when you’re both calm.
  • Take some deep breaths. Deep breathing has been shown to reduce blood pressure and promote feelings of calmness. Try this simple breathing activity any time you need to de-stress.
  • Exercise. It’s a known stress buster and you may even find that it helps you deal with anger. Go for a short walk outside, hit some tennis balls, or push around some heavy weights at the gym—these are all constructive ways to deal with stress and anger.
  • Listen to music. We can all think of some songs that calm us down. Make a special CD or playlist that you can turn to when you need it. Identify this as a trigger of emotional eating.
  • Prevent stress from happening again. If mornings are so busy that you’re barely able to get out the door on time, put some time-management skills into practice so that you don’t have to rush or feel stressed each morning.

Sadness and Loneliness
These two emotions often go hand in hand. Loneliness can result in sadness, and sad people can often become withdrawn. Especially if you’re dealing with grief or spending a lot of time alone, it’s easy to turn to comfort foods or soothe yourself with foods that you associate with happier memories. Instead, work to replace these uncomfortable emotions with a positive action. Learn to use alternative activities as sources of gratification. Just as you’ve learned to turn to food for a pick-me-up, you can learn to use other activities in the same way.

  • Exercise. It boosts mood, releases endorphins (feel-good chemicals in the brain), and has even been reported to be more addictive than drugs. Anything you do to get yourself moving will work. Leaving the house for a short bike ride or walk will also help you avoid food temptations at home.
  • Play with your pet; animals have unconditional love and promote health and emotional wellness, too. If you don’t have a pet, volunteer at a local shelter, which will expose you to both animals and more social interaction to combat your loneliness.
  • Write a letter to a friend. Reaching out to friends and family members, even if you haven’t talked to them in awhile, will remind you of all the wonderful people in your life who care about you. Spark up an old friendship!
  • Volunteer. People who volunteer feel better about themselves, and it’s hard to feel down on yourself when you’re helping others.
  • Post on the message boards! Even if you feel like you don’t have a friend in the world, there is always someone here at SparkPeople who can help pick you up when you are feeling down.

Boredom
We have hundreds of TV channels, phones that surf the web, online social networks, and movement-sensing video games, but when it comes down to it, we still feel bored in our lives. Eating adds another layer to our entertainment options (like popcorn at a movie) but also becomes an easy thing to do when we don’t know what else to do! After all, eating is fun and enjoyable, and it passes the time. Fortunately, many boredom-busting activities don’t involve eating.

  • Pay attention to what you consume. Make a new rule that you will not multitask while you eat. That means no chips while on the computer and no ice cream while watching your favorite TV drama. If you’re going to eat, you’re going to be present and focus on the food you’re enjoying to help avoid mindless overeating.
  • Develop a new hobby. Even without cash to spare, you can learn to knit, join a local book club, or train for a 5K race. By scheduling these activities regularly, you’ll have plenty to do—and practice! Make a list of all the things you ever wanted to learn, from cooking to speaking a new language, and start investigating how to get started.
  • Read. We don’t spend enough time reading these days, and while you may claim that you don’t have the time, everyone has a few minutes here and there. Carry your book, favorite newspaper or magazine with you and steal minutes whenever you have downtime. Set a goal to read just 15 minutes each night, and you may find that stretching longer (and keeping your mind and fingers busy enough that they won’t miss eating).
  • Play a game. Remember how fun board and card games can be? Some even take hours! Bring out a fun game for your next party or set up a game night with your best friend. If you’re by yourself, crossword puzzles are a good alternative.
  • Connect with friends and loved ones. Some might argue that we feel so bored during this digital age because we’re missing real-life interaction and friendships. After all, if you can post on your friend’s Facebook wall or text your brother anytime, why call? Make a point to write letters, send personal emails, make phone calls and meet up with the important people in your life.

With an arsenal of activities you can do besides eating, you’re on the right path to stop the emotional eating cycle. You might not be successful every time, but if you accept your mistakes and move forward, continuing to work on your issues by tracking, journaling and distracting yourself in a positive way, you’ll overcome your emotional eating problems once and for all. With so many enjoyable experiences in life, food doesn’t have to take center stage. Make sure you are taking time to enjoy all of them equally!

Original Post on SparkPeople.com

Large Single Family Home – East Orange

Contact info:
Robert T George | RTG Property Solutions LLC | 609-474-0360

Large Single Family Home – East Orange

106 Hollywood Ave, East Orange, NJ 07018

$100,000

KEY FEATURES
Year Built: 1930
Sq Footage: 2257 sqft.
Bedrooms: 4 Beds
Bathrooms: 2.5 Baths
Parking: 1 Off street
Lot Size: 5227 Square Feet
Property Type: Single Family House

DESCRIPTION


Large single family house. HUD owned being sold “As Is”. buyer is responsible for all inspections and certifications. HUD case # 352-393613

PROPERTY FEATURES


  • Living room
  • Dining room
  • Master bath

COMMUNITY FEATURES


  • Off-street parking

Contact info:
Robert T George
RTG Property Solutions LLC
609-474-0360